During your pregnancy you will be checked regularly. As you pregnancy progresses you will be seen more frequently. Blood pressure, weight, growth of the baby and how you feel, are all monitored.

That is monitoring during pregnancy.

Normal labor starts spontaneously between 37 and 42 weeks. Every day in this period is good.  Currently there is a lot of discussion about induction as a routine at 41 weeks of pregnancy. The last word has not been said about it, and on this website we will not go into this subject.

Additional monitoring will be offered from 41 weeks on to see if the baby is still doing well. If you are feeling well and the baby is moving normally and there is enough amniotic fluid, there is nothing to worry about. A baby whose placenta is not functioning will move less. Every movement uses up oxygen. So when you feel your baby kicking and moving normally he or she has enough oxygen. Any changes in the normal moving pattern of your baby that worry you at any time, are reason to contact your caregiver.

Induction for no good reason is not advisable. Induction of labor is one of the most abused interventions in obstetrics. A uterus that is not ready for labor is forced. It will take a long time for the contractions to become effective contractions. A parasympathetic process is disrupted.

Eventually of course the  woman gives birth, but often these labors are protracted and painful. To manage the pain you can get an epidural. But that increases the risk of a vacuum or forcipal delivery. Many mothers look back on an induction with mixed feelings

A woman who had a good birth is likely to rise from her childbed in good condition. She and her baby have bonded well, breastfeeding is no problem and she can take up her normal daily routine.

A mother who is still exhausted after 10 days, suffering from painful stitches, who doesn’t sleep well, and  cannot take care of her baby the way she would have liked,  will often experience a sense of failure. Every year 1-2% of all new mothers develop a post-traumatic stress disorder after childbirth.

Your sense of well-being also needs to be monitored!

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